THE WILMOT FAMILY BURIAL PLOT IN ST MARY'S CHURCHYARD, CHADDESDEN, DERBYSHIRE, HAS BEEN REFURBISHED.
15 May 2013

Colonel Sir Henry Wilmot VC, KCB, 2nd Bn, The Rifle Brigade, died on the 7th April 1901 in Bournemouth, Dorset, and was buried in the Wilmot family plot in St Mary's Churchyard, Chaddesden, Derbyshire. Although the three headstones in the plot were robustly constructed they were in need of a good refurbishment and clean up.

Step up local historian Tony Higton, who is well known in the Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire area for refurbishing other Victoria Cross holders' graves in the two counties.

On Wednesday, 15th May 2013, a ceremony was held in the St Mary's Churchyard to unveil the completely refurbished Wilmot family plot, which includes the grave of Colonel Sir Henry Wilmot VC KCB.

Seventy school children from four different schools attended the ceremony along with members of the congregation of St Mary's Church.



Wilmot family grave:
before and after


For the award of the Victoria Cross

[ London Gazette, 24 December 1858 ], Lucknow, Indian Mutiny, 11 March 1858, Captain ( Brevet Major ) Henry Wilmot, 2nd Bn, Rifle Brigade.

For conspicuous gallantry at Lucknow on the 11th March 1858.

Captain Wilmotís Company was engaged with a large body of the enemy, near the Iron Bridge. That officer found himself at the end of a street with only four of his men, opposed to a considerable body. One of the four was shot through both legs, and became utterly helpless; two men lifted him up, and although Private Hawkes was severely wounded, he carried him for a considerable distance, exposed to the fire of the enemy, Captain Wilmot firing with the menís rifles, and covering the retreat of the party.

( Despatch of Brigadier-General Walpole CB, dated 20th of March 1858 )

Henry Wilmot was invested with his Victoria Cross in India in 1859, by whom and where is not known.


For the award of the Victoria Cross

[ London Gazette, 24 December 1858 ], Lucknow, Indian Mutiny, 11 March 1858, Corporal William Nash & Private David Hawkes, 2nd Bn, Rifle Brigade.

At Lucknow, whilst members of Captain Wilmotís company, they found themselves at the end of a street with four companions facing a large body of the enemy. One of the men was shot through both legs and both lifted the man up and carried him a considerable distance under heavy fire.

William Nash and David Hawkes were invested with their Victoria Crosses in India in 1859, by whom and where is not known.

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Iain Stewart, 23 May 2013